Charli Persip Medical Fund

Jazz drummer Charli Persip

I just saw this news on the Four on the Floor blog about Charli Persip and want to help spread the word.

Please consider helping out if you are able. You can donate on Go Fund Me or the family will also accept a check if you message them privately. Details below.

From the Go Fund Me page:

“Famed jazz drummer, Charli Persip, known for his band SuperSound, has played with jazz legends such as Dizzy Gillespie and Billy Eckstine. Unfortunately, in recent years, Charli Persip has been struggling with illness. Due to this, he had to stop doing what he loves the most; performing and teaching. This has left him to fall on hard times financially due to medical bills.

We are reaching out to the jazz community at this time for any contributions towards the Charli Persip medical fund. He would greatly appreciate the support. You can e-mail his family at charlipersip@yahoo.com as well.

Here is a video of Charli Persip’s Surprise 90th Birthday Party and Benefit concert that took place on Saturday, July 20th, featuring over 60 musicians including Jack DeJohnette, Don Byron, Jeff ‘Tain’ Watts, Barry Harris, Andrew Cyrille, Sherman Irby, Nasheet Waits, Eric McPherson, Paul West, Mickey Bass, Marcus Baylor, Craig Harris, Bob Stewart, Jack Walrath, Freddie Hendrix, E.J. Strickland, Patience Higgins, Warren Smith, Todd Bashore, Don Sickler, Taru Alexander, among others. Hosted by Nabaté Isles:”

Philly Joe Jones Solo Book

Updated July 2019 – This post was originally posted in 2017. Two years later there’s a new version of The Philly Joe Jones Solo Book available with an additional 32 transcribed drum solos! I’ll list them at the bottom of this post.

The Philly Joe Jones Solo Book is well worth the $50 – $60 price tag. It was transcribed over the course of 10 years by Joerg Eckel, a student of John Riley’s.

There are over 320 380 pages of Philly Joe Jones drum solo transcriptions in the book. Each one includes stickings and lists the album that each solo is on.

You can get a copy at Memphis Drum Shop or Columbus Percussion. I’ve heard that Maxwell’s Drum Shop will be getting some copies as well.


Read on for details, photos and the list of solos included in the book.

Continue reading “Philly Joe Jones Solo Book”

Art Taylor Interview

As part of the Louis Armstrong Jazz Oral History Project, Warren Smith interviewed Art Taylor for 1 hour and 50 minutes! He sits at the drums briefly during the interview and tells a funny story. Be sure to catch that.

The entire interview is full of wonderful insights and he talks at length about the process of writing his book, Notes and Tones.

Notes and Tones

Notes and Tones book cover

Notes and Tones is one of the most controversial, honest, and insightful books ever written about jazz.

It consists of 29 conversations which drummer Arthur Taylor held with the most influential jazz musicians of the ’60s and ’70s

Interviews include Art Blakey, Betty Carter, Don Cherry, Kenny Clarke, Ornette Coleman, Miles Davis, Kenny Dorham, Dizzy Gillespie, Hampton Hawes, Freddie Hubbard, Elvin Jones, Carmen McRae, Max Roach, Sonny Rollins, Nina Simone and Randy Weston.

I highly recommend buying a copy if you don’t have it.

When I was attending Berklee in Boston I was fortunate see Art Taylor play at the Regatta Bar and asked him to autograph my copy.

The expanded edition of Notes and Tones is supplemented with previously unpublished interviews with Dexter Gordon and Thelonious Monk, a new introduction by the author, and new photographs.

Here’s a bonus radio interview with Art Taylor on Eric in the Evening (WGBH Boston) from 1994.

Joe Chambers Interview

I think I first heard drummer Joe Chambers as part of Max Roach’s M’Boom or Wayne Shorter’s Adam’s Apple, but I’ll admit I didn’t check him out much beyond that until recently.

I’ve been digging into his discography after picking up a copy of Bobby Hutcherson’s album Total Eclipse. It’s a great album that features Harold Land, Chick Corea, Reggie Johnson and Joe Chambers and I’m glad it was recently reissued.

This interview from 2016 clocks in at 53 minutes and it’s worth sticking with the whole thing.