Dan Weiss Instagram Transcription

I get a lot of inspiration from Instagram posts and want to start sharing some of my transcriptions.

I’ve been fortunate to take a couple of lessons from Dan Weiss and am a huge fan of his Patreon page. Every week I’m working on something new that’s fun and challenging because of an idea he sparked or a direct exercise he’s given.

I can’t remember how I first became aware of Dan, but this is one of the first Instagram videos I saw from him and I was obsessed with it. It took a long time to transcribe and I went so far as to email him to see if I got it right.

I asked him if he thought about it as 16th notes or triplets. He said that it could go either way. As 16th notes it works out to a 3 beat pattern. As triplets it’s a full measure of 4/4 time.

It’s a great exercise to work on and it hits multiple things, which is common for his exercises. It really helped my left arm mobility, stick accuracy, concentration, and coordination.

Transcription

Work on as triplets and 16th notes separately until it’s comfortable. After that, try playing the pattern at the same rate, but change your thinking and counting to get used to feeling it both ways.

Be patient if it’s difficult. Eventually, you’ll want to add in the right hand on the rim of the floor tom or cymbal. Try reading from Syncopation or New Breed and then improvise.

Bonus

Check out this duo performance of Solar with Dan Weiss and Ben Wendel on tenor sax that was put out last week.

Triplet Warm Up Exercise

For most of my life warm up exercises were always something I did before gigs. I never really thought too much about warming up for a practice session. Lately, I’m finding that I can practice much longer (physically and mentally) if I warm up.

As with my last post, I try to make sure that I’m not just going through the motions while warming up, but working on something with purpose that’s helping me grow in some way at the same time.

Here’s a simple one that’s great to start slow to work on control while building up the muscle memory to effortlessly pull off singles, doubles and paradiddles between the snare drum and bass drum while playing the standard jazz cymbal pattern.

Download as PDF

Triplet Warm Up for Jazz Drummers

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Coordination Confusion

I’ve been doing a new practice warm-up that has been an excellent tool for growth and also jumpstarts my concentration and attention for the rest of my practice session.

In my practice journal I call it “coordination confusion.”
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I keep it slow to encourage concentration and control, usually between 60-80 bpm.

Coordination Confusion exercise for drummers

 

Coordination Confusion – PDF Download

 

Hands: RLRL RLRL RLRL RLRL
Feet: RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL

Once that’s comfortable, I keep the same pattern with the feet, but flip the hands.

Hands: LRLR LRLR LRLR LRLR
Feet: RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL

Next up is flipping the paradiddle I have going with the bass drum and hi-hat pedals.

Hands: RLRL RLRL RLRL RLRL
Feet: LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRR

&

Hands: LRLR LRLR LRLR LRLR
Feet: LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRR

I try switching patterns every 4-8 measures. Remember, this is not about speed. It’s about control of your mind and body to set you up for a focused practice session.

Once this gets easy (and it will with time), play doubles with the hands at the same eighth note rate.

Hands: RRLL RRLL RRLL RRLL
Feet: RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL

Hands: LLRR LLRR LLRR LLRR
Feet: RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL

Hands: RRLL RRLL RRLL RRLL
Feet: LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRR

Hands: LLRR LLRR LLRR LLRR
Feet: LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRR

Bonus: Move from eighth notes to triplets for an added challenge.

Coordination Confusion – PDF Download